Posts Tagged ‘flower’

Kiss Me and See

Posted: September 16, 2015 in Love Poems
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I am the ember

to your flower;

but I can’t stay red,

and you won’t remain evergreen.

Let’s use each other up

while time allows

our beauty to be seen.

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Love, friends, is

the real double-edged sword.

 

Human love can be absent

on one heart’s part

and thus be sweeter than a lie,

poisoning the other person.

 

Love is what can split a man

in two.

Love is what can cut a man deeply-

losing love, that is.

As humans

we look for love

in the in-sync beating of two hearts.

Which is why we are fools

who destroy

love.

 

But love

can be taken

and melted down

into plows,

and till the fields

so that buds may push

through and taste the air,

and blossom into strong stalks

and stand against wind and rain and storms.

Love is always there.

Even if the stalk is knocked down,

some seeds were shaken loose

and stuck in the fertile ground.

There they take root.

 

Love, dear friends,

is never a lost cause.

A few things I’ve learned from other poets and my own experience:

  • Experiment with form and style– try new things, and find which fits best with which poem. There’s also nothing wrong with trying to emulate one of your favorite poet’s style.
  • Verb your nouns– “lip”, “trash”, and “access” are examples of this.
  • Drop your articles– avoid use of “the” and “a” as much as possible
  • Concrete conquers flowers– concrete descriptions are far more interesting and adaptable than vague adjectives- they are much more visual and give more meaning to your words, as well as making what you’re saying more understandable for readers. Adjectives should be used sparingly.
  • Writer’s Block happens– do whatever you think will get rid of it.
  •  Read your finished poems out loud– reading out loud allows you to check for mistakes, and printing  physical copy before hand and reading that is always a good idea.
  • Have someone else read your poems– readers rarely have the luxury of being able to ask the poet what he or she means, you can leave the meaning of your poems up to interpretation, but you want to make your main message as clear as possible so no one pulls a conclusion out of left field.
  • “It’s the poet’s job to know everything.”– whether it be anatomy, mathematical terminology, or various plants, a poet should refine his or her knowledge of many, many subjects
  • There’s poetry in EVERYTHING– from the most mundane tasks to the grandest events, famous poets have covered both, as well as many things in between.