Posts Tagged ‘knowledge’

of when your eyes connect with another’s

and heat jumps through your body

and you want to know them,

and you want them to know you;

you want them to want

to understand

like you want to

understand

them.

To what Lengths does

the green lawn Grass grow?

In this Modern Age, it seems,

That we’ll never Know.

And the Wind Howls out in anger,

such Feelings I repressed,

but the Universe- it Knows me-

and Wants to be noticed.

“I believe the universe wants to be noticed.” -from The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green

The walls know of your financial trouble.

The walls have heard you and your wife

scream at each other,

volume and pitch ascending, a two-person opera.

The walls know your children’s contained secrets.

They know what your son looks at

on his computer, and lusts after.

They listen to your daughter’s conversations

with herself, her diary, her friends.

The walls know your struggles,

they see blood boil under your skin,

see tears run like beads of quartz

down hills and valleys of your face,

hear each footstep- feel the hammers

or leopard steps they could be.

The walls know you.

They have Guarded you.

If only I had the wisdom

of a wild beast.

I would stay away from open, offered palms,

and not listen to words sweetened by inflection.

I could smell the metallic bitterness, the buried dishonesty;

taste fear in the saltiness of sweat on the air–

as pungent as rotting meat.

Trust would have to be earned

by genuine kindness–

the warmth of a blanket, or the offering of food.

Care would have to be received

in order for affection to surface.

I would not be blinded

by human facades and false kindness.

I wouldn’t be wounded easily.

If only I had the wisdom of a wild beast,

who thrives through caution,

and is not tricked by open palms, or sweetly coated words.

A few things I’ve learned from other poets and my own experience:

  • Experiment with form and style– try new things, and find which fits best with which poem. There’s also nothing wrong with trying to emulate one of your favorite poet’s style.
  • Verb your nouns– “lip”, “trash”, and “access” are examples of this.
  • Drop your articles– avoid use of “the” and “a” as much as possible
  • Concrete conquers flowers– concrete descriptions are far more interesting and adaptable than vague adjectives- they are much more visual and give more meaning to your words, as well as making what you’re saying more understandable for readers. Adjectives should be used sparingly.
  • Writer’s Block happens– do whatever you think will get rid of it.
  •  Read your finished poems out loud– reading out loud allows you to check for mistakes, and printing  physical copy before hand and reading that is always a good idea.
  • Have someone else read your poems– readers rarely have the luxury of being able to ask the poet what he or she means, you can leave the meaning of your poems up to interpretation, but you want to make your main message as clear as possible so no one pulls a conclusion out of left field.
  • “It’s the poet’s job to know everything.”– whether it be anatomy, mathematical terminology, or various plants, a poet should refine his or her knowledge of many, many subjects
  • There’s poetry in EVERYTHING– from the most mundane tasks to the grandest events, famous poets have covered both, as well as many things in between.